The best anything in the world

The best anything in the world

 

The best activity in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best way of being in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best identity in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best hope in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best love in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best life in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best work in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best romance in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best purpose in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best goal in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best pleasure in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best relationship in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

The best anything in the world is to pursue God’s heart. To worship.

 

Inspired by the life of Josh Larkin.
Especially inspired by the commemoration given by his mentor at his Taylor memorial service.

 

Do not think for a second that the blessing of Josh has ended.

Do not think for a second that the blessing of Josh has ended.

Larkins, you raised up a boy who was bent on blessing. A serial blesser, who blessed like he breathed.

In a sad Facebook post, I wrote that I wept for those who would not be blessed by Josh in the future. I eventually acknowledged that I was also grateful for the blessing that had already come. But what I was missing, what I now realize, is the blessings of Josh that are yet to come.

I’m a math guy, and I respect numbers, or rather, quantitativeness, even in squishy, human, relational, spiritual settings.

And here’s what I know. The hundreds, maybe thousands of people who knew Josh, and knew what a blesser he was, probably grieved the same grief as I did — that his blessings would be absent from the world. And I wouldn’t be surprised if most of them in the next breath breathed in the same resolve I did, to bless like there’ s no tomorrow, knowing that there might not be.

Josh’s death — the loss of a blesser — reminds me that life is not an experience, it is a war. It is a war between pain and love, between Good and the absence of Good, God and the absence of God. A phrase that has echoed through my head is “losing a wingman”. Realizing that a lost friend is actually a lost comrade teaches my soul many things.

Josh’s example is inspiring. Josh was one of a very few people I knew who I could always count on to conspire goodness with me, to scheme and plot respect, encouragement, and love. He gave kindness to others that I didn’t know how to give on my own.

My spiritual hope, as best I can hold it, is that Christ is Victor. My earthly hope, in the face of earthly pain and loss, is a hope in influence and inspiration. A hope that the example of Josh in Kingdom Kindness will drive the members of that crowd of people already blessed by him to each take up that same torch of blessing more than ever before in their own lives. That they (we) will recognize that love is a war, and redouble our efforts. That the lost blessings from one Josh will become the gained blessings increasingly poured out from many Josh-lovers.

I am told that God works ALL things for good.

And in this instance, I think I can see how.