In which I learn 3 mind-boggling geographical ideas

You know how sometimes you discover AFTER graduation what you really wish you had taken more classes in? For me, it’s geography. I never took a single geography class while I was in college. And since I’m about to dive into an extended reading project focused on geography, I thought I’d better start with an introduction. So… I bought a (used, older version) textbook and read it… cover to cover… for fun.

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, you can tell someone is a serious geek when they do homework in their spare time. (Fun fact: Before I learned to read and write I would color with markers on paper and turn it in to my teacher mother as my “homework”. True story.)

human geographyAnyway. The textbook I chose to read was Human Geography: People, Place, and Culture. I think they’re up to edition ten by now, but I got the eighth edition to save a few bucks. I was more interested in the broader geographical principles than in having the most up-to-date stats and examples. And learn broad geographical principles I did! I really enjoyed trying on a new lens through which to view the world — and it even became practically useful, as you’ll see below! There was a lot of new (and some familiar) information in my textbook, but three main ideas really struck me and stuck with me, and I’ll spend a little time delving into each one.

1. Scale covers over a multitude of sins

One of the pretty foundational geographical principles I learned in the very first chapter is the concept of “scale“. Basically, this means that it matters on what level(s) you look at an issue — for example, at a national, regional, or local level.

When I first read this concept, I was like “Duh… I know how to read maps.” But the far-reaching implications of this principle became clear just a few days later.

As a part of Daniel’s and my web presence consulting business, I write blog posts for a client who works in the healthcare realm. In writing a piece about how Obamacare premiums are projected to change for 2015, I found this article whose headline (“Obamacare premiums slated to rise by an average of 7.5 percent”) touts a smaller-than-previously-projected national increase in healthcare premiums for plans provided through the Affordable Care Act. What lurks beneath this title — and what I discovered after reading the rest of the article — is that looking only at the national average TOTALLY OBSCURES the fact that predictions for premium changes state by state vary wildly. For example, the premiums in Indiana may rise as much as 15%, while premiums in Oregon are predicted to drop by about 2%. Not only that, but if you zoom in even further to different sub-markets within states, you find even MORE variation. Some customers in Nevada might have their premiums go up by 36%, and the premiums for some customers in Arizona could drop by 23%.

The point of this is to illustrate how scale can be used to completely twist and spin (or just get more perspective on) any issue, depending how you look at it. If I was a rabid Obamacare hater, I could truthfully write a headline of “Obamacare premiums skyrocket by 36% for some customers”. Or if I was a rabid Obamacare over-zealot, I could truthfully write a headline of “Obamacare premiums predicted to decrease, lower costs by 23% for some”. And those are BOTH TECHNICALLY TRUE.

Basically, in the principle of scale we discover the genesis of the saying “lies, damned lies, and statistics” — because changes in scale enable us to turn statistics into lies. Mind-boggling.

2. The idea of the modern nation-state is… well, modern.

I still remember how I felt back in 2008 when Russia invaded Georgia. It was something along the lines of, “Countries can still DO that???” After years of schooling and memorizing where everything went on a world map that had nice, solid, unchanging borders, I was shocked to learn that a modern nation-state would ever actually overtly attack another nation-state. They were both internationally recognized by the other nation-states, and all that conflict stuff was ancient history, from before those nice solid boundary lines got put on a map… right? Maps are PERMANENT, right?

Wrong! The textbook gives a brief overview:

The political map of the world… becomes so natural-looking to us that we begin to think it is natural.

The world map of states is anything but natural. The mosaic of states on the map represents a way of politically organizing space (into states) that is fewer than 400 years old. Just as people create places, imparting character to space and shaping culture, people make states. States and state boundaries are made, shaped, and refined by people, their actions, and their history. Even the idea of dividing the world into territorially defined states is one created and exported by people. (p.222)

Whoa. The mind-blowing is exacerbated by the distinction drawn between territoriality (asserting control over a specific geographical area) and sovereignty, which is a complex concept that basically means a body (e.g. a government or a leader) has political and military control over a people or territory — but it doesn’t have to always be the same territory:

American Indian tribes behaved territorially but not necessarily exclusively. Plains tribes shared hunting grounds with neighboring tribes who were friendly, and they fought over hunting grounds with neighboring tribes who were unfriendly. Territorial boundaries were shifting; they were not delineated on the ground. Plains tribes also held territory communally — individual tribal members did not “own” land. In a political sense, territoriality was most expressed by tribes [rather than individuals] within the Plains. Similarly, in Southeast Asia and in Africa, the concept of sovereignty and state-like political entitles also existed. In all of these places and in Europe before the mid-1600s, sovereignty was expressed over a people rather than a defined and bordered territory. A sovereign had subjects who followed (and happened to live in a place) rather than a defined space to rule. (p.223, emphasis added)

DUDE. So basically, the idea of sovereignty and territory (a) always going hand-in-hand and (b) being fixed and unchangeable on a map is TOTALLY NEW AND WEIRD. Which is funny, because I didn’t really know that until, you know, now. I feel like the entire of history just opened up into a giant realm of WHAT. (Total side note: I feel slightly impressed that this description of Native tribal sovereignty is vaguely similar to Daniel’s metaphor about gas molecules back at the beginning of LH/WK. /end of self-congratulation party)

The textbook quips, “Once you become a geographer, you begin to question every map you examine” (p.149). So far I’ve found that to be true — and that has made the idea of the modern nation-state get even fuzzier. When I look at a map now, I find myself asking more questions than I get answers: When did these particular boundary lines get drawn? Who drew them? What ethnic or language groups are present within these borders? How do they feel about the borders — is their group bisected by political boundaries, or do they have some recognition in their political home state? What natural features are contained within or used to demarcate the borders of this country? Who named the country? Who named and designated its capital? What do those decisions say about who holds power and what’s important to this country’s culture and history? 

…And of course, it’s just not possible to cram ALL that information into one map! Which means I have now embarked on the endless quest of geographical question-asking. I guess I’m a real geographer now, because I’ll never look at any map again without thinking of a million questions! Luckily I hope to start answering some of them as I read more of the books in this project (e.g. place-naming… can’t wait for that book!).

3. Where does our crap go?

I like recycling as much as the next gal, but I guess I never really thought very far along the chain of what happens to my trash after the garbage truck picks it up. As such, I was rather shocked to read the following little segment on waste disposal in my textbook:

According to current estimates, the United States produces about 1.7 kilograms (3.7 pounds) of solid waste per person per day, which adds up to well over 160 million metric tons (just under 180 million tons) per year. … Disposal of these wastes is a major worldwide problem. The growing volume of waste must be put somewhere, but space for it is no longer easy to find. … The number of suitable sites for sanitary landfills is decreasing… and it is increasingly difficult to design new sites. In the United States landfill capacity has been reached or will soon be reached in about a dozen States, most of them in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions, and those States must now buy space from other States for this purpose. Trucking or sending garbage by rail to distant landfills is very expensive, but there are few alternatives.

Similar problems arise on a global scale. The United States, the European Union, and Japan export solid (including hazardous) wastes to countries in Africa, Middle and South America, and East Asia. While these countries are paid for accepting the waste, they do not have the capacity to treat it properly. So the waste often is dumped in open landfills, where it creates the very hazards that the exporters want to avoid. (p.404, emphasis added)

So basically we’re running out of places to pile our crap. (Side Question: Doesn’t it ever break down? Or are we just producing more trash too quickly?) That’s a bit alarming already, and we haven’t even gotten to the section about toxic and radioactive waste yet…

High-level radioactive waste [emits strong radiation; produced by nuclear power and weapons facilities] is extremely dangerous and difficult to get rid of. Fuel rods from nuclear reactors will remain radioactive for thousands of years and must be stored in remote places where they will not contaminate water, air, or any other part of the environment.

They must be taken OUTSIDE THE ENVIRONMENT!!! …Wait a minute…….

In fact, no satisfactory means or place for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been found. (p.404-405, emphasis added)

Okay — I’ve seen enough James Bond movies to know that being exposed to radiation is BAD. Is anyone else REALLY REALLY DISTURBED by the fact that there is NO way to prevent all our nuclear stuff from seeping into our environment? I get that we didn’t necessarily know this when we first invented nuclear power and stuff, but I mean… now that we know… you think maybe we should stop making more until we’ve figured that one out? I mean, I’m no nuclear physicist, but… I kind of like not eating radiation… Just saying…

Anyway, consider me officially alarmed by what seems like a rather imminently dangerous situation in terms of waste generation and disposal. I’m urgently looking forward to learning more (hopefully!) in my last few books for this project, All Our Relations and Plastic Free.

Bonus: What about the potatoes?

Oh — and for those of you who are here because I asked where potatoes come from back in the last post, look! I already have an answer for you!

The corn (maize) we associate with the American Corn Belt diffused from Central America and Southern Mexico into North America. … The white potato we associate with Ireland and Idaho came originally from the Andean highlands but was brought to Europe in the 1600s where it became a staple from Ireland to the eastern expanses of the North European Plain. The banana we associate with Central America came from Southeast Asia, as did a variety of yams. (p.334)

This world is SO COMPLEX. And I’m just starting to dig into it! =)

Tune in next time for a journey through 1491: New Revelations of the Americas before Columbus.

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In which Madeleine L’Engle is one of my favorites!

For some of you fellow bookworms who have chatted with me about books, you know that Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time is one of my favorite books. I already loved it to pieces when I read it (and its sequels) as a kid. Then I found an audiobook version where Madeleine herself narrates Wrinkle, and I loved it even more because it feels like you sort of know her  by how she reads the book (which is perfectly how I imagined it).

a circle of quiet lengleI remember my mom once told me, “You know, Madeleine L’Engle has written some adult non-fiction books, too. You should check them out.” But I sort of let it drift into vague-land… until recently.

I found and bought a copy of the first book in “The Crosswicks Journals”,  A Circle of Quiet, and let it sit on my to-read shelf for a bit. I had a full plate working through my Little House / Wounded Knee project, so I didn’t pay Circle much attention. Then about a week ago, when I was lolling around with nothing in particular to read, feeling a little down about life, I saw this book out of the corner of my eye. I picked it up and flipped to read the reviews on the back and found, “My favorite of all Madeleine L’Engle’s books. Lovely, charming, a book to cherish. I know it will give great consolation to ordinary people who sometimes wonder why they bother to get out of bed in the morning.

Needless to say, I was sold!

I snuggled in on the couch and started to read… and was BLOWN. AWAY. by the simple, thoughtful, soulful musings of Madeleine L’Engle, writing her thoughts on life, nature, philosophy, marriage, and writing (among others) from her family’s farm house, Crosswicks, in New England. It really did lift my spirits. It felt like this book was A Wrinkle in Time for grown-ups, because it’s about real life, but it’s the same sensible, spiritual Madeleine at the helm.

Anyways. I could rave about this book all day — I’m really excited to read the second one — but for now I just want to let Madeleine’s writing speak for itself and share a few of the way-too-many-to-write-down-because-I’d-write-the-whole-book passages that really struck me and stuck with me.

On community & identity:

Grandma gave me herself, and so helped to give me myself. (p.58)

On illness, death, and relationship:

She was not our mother, child, wife. Our lives would be basically unchanged by her death, except in the sense that our lives are changed by every death. And I think that we all, except perhaps nurses and doctors who see it all the time, have a primitive instinct to withdraw from death, even if we manage to conceal our pulling away. There is always the memento mori, the realization that death is contagious; it is contracted the moment we are conceived.

I always took a bath when I got home from the hospital.

It takes a tremendous maturity, a maturity I don’t possess, to strike the balance of involvement/detachment which makes us creatively useful, able to be compassionate, to be involved in the other person’s suffering rather than in our own response to it. (p.118-119)

On community, the Establishment, and revolution:

Because we are human, these communities [family, village, church, city, country, globe] tend to become rigid. They stop evolving, revolving, which is essential to their life, as is the revolution of the earth about the sun essential to the life of our planet, our full family and basic establishment. Hence, we must constantly be in a state of revolution, or we die. But revolution does not mean that the earth flings away from the sun into structureless chaos. As I understand the beauty of the earth’s dance around the sun, so also do I understand the constant revolution of the community of the Son. (p.131)

Seriously, so much wisdom and humor and real life words in this book. Go grab a copy and give it a try. You won’t regret it!

“Uncertainty is in every true discernment…”

Today I don’t have any particular declarations. I just wanted to share with you what I think is a really profound little nugget from a fascinating and wide-ranging in-depth interview with Pope Francis (hat tip to Nina for the full interview link!). Read and ponder [emphasis added]:

Certitude and Mistakes

I ask, “So if the encounter with God is not an ‘empirical eureka,’ and if it is a journey that sees with the eyes of history, then we can also make mistakes?”

The pope replies: “Yes, in this quest to seek and find God in all things there is still an area of uncertainty. There must be. If a person says that he met God with total certainty and is not touched by a margin of uncertainty, then this is not good. For me, this is an important key. If one has the answers to all the questions—that is the proof that God is not with him. It means that he is a false prophet using religion for himself. The great leaders of the people of God, like Moses, have always left room for doubt. You must leave room for the Lord, not for our certainties; we must be humble. Uncertainty is in every true discernment that is open to finding confirmation in spiritual consolation.

“The risk in seeking and finding God in all things, then, is the willingness to explain too much, to say with human certainty and arrogance: ‘God is here.’ We will find only a god that fits our measure. The correct attitude is that of St. Augustine: seek God to find him, and find God to keep searching for God forever. Often we seek as if we were blind, as one often reads in the Bible. And this is the experience of the great fathers of the faith, who are our models. We have to re-read the Letter to the Hebrews, Chapter 11. Abraham leaves his home without knowing where he was going, by faith. All of our ancestors in the faith died seeing the good that was promised, but from a distance…. Our life is not given to us like an opera libretto, in which all is written down; but it means going, walking, doing, searching, seeing…. We must enter into the adventure of the quest for meeting God; we must let God search and encounter us.

“Because God is first; God is always first and makes the first move. God is a bit like the almond flower of your Sicily, Antonio, which always blooms first. We read it in the Prophets. God is encountered walking, along the path. At this juncture, someone might say that this is relativism. Is it relativism? Yes, if it is misunderstood as a kind of indistinct pantheism. It is not relativism if it is understood in the biblical sense, that God is always a surprise, so you never know where and how you will find him. You are not setting the time and place of the encounter with him. You must, therefore, discern the encounter. Discernment is essential.

 

In which I brag on my high school girls…

Today when I met with the group of 10th grade girls I mentor we talked about our goals and plans for the year. As a part of planning some of our discussions, I had each of them brainstorm quietly on a piece of paper a few topics they’d like us to address. When I brought them home and started to read them, I was BLOWN AWAY by not only the depth of their thoughts but the breadth! I love to brag on these wonderful ladies, so I thought I’d share my compiled outline of their thoughts. I’ve reworded and done a tad of fleshing out (like on “sin”) to make it be a proper outline, but all the ideas are theirs — there is not a topic here that doesn’t come from what they wrote down!

Suggested Discussion Topics for 2013-2014

1. Who Is God?

  • Character & attributes

2. How do we experience God?

  • Do you have a personal relationship with God?
  • Do you ever think God’s not listening or you don’t see him in your daily life?
  • Talking to God (Prayer)
    • What is prayer?
    • Why should we pray?
    • How should / do we pray?
    • What experiences do we have with prayer? (Is God answering your prayers?)

3. Why does God matter to us?

  • Sin.
    • What is sin?
    • What does God think about sin? / How does sin affect our relationship with God?
  • Salvation.
    • How does God “fix” sin?
    • Repentance, Forgiveness, & Reconciliation.
      • What does it mean to “repent”?
      • What is forgiveness?
  • Predestination vs. Free Will

4. What does it mean to be a Christian? / How do we respond to God?

  • What is a Christian?
  • Church history / denominational family tree
  • What does the Bible say Christians should do / be like?

Love God

  • What is worship?
  • How can we love God (more) ?
  • How do I be more Christ-like / How do I live out my faith?

Love Others

  • What does it mean to love my neighbor? / Who is my neighbor?
  • Loving my enemies
  • The body of Christ: Community, Encouragement, etc.

General

  • What is the Bible? How should / do I read it?
  • How to be an example / mentor
  • Dealing with tough stuff (e.g. death, depression, loneliness, etc.)
  • The female body: body image, modesty, etc.
  • School: Managing time wisely
  • How to be a light at a Christian school (dealing with disagreement / hypocrisy)
  • Revenge
  • Witnessing: Being a light / telling others about Christ
  • What does the Bible say about how to be a righteous woman?
  • Being a Christian even in the midst of “coolness” / Dealing with peer pressure
  • Healthy relationships
    • Family
    • Romantic
    • Friends
    • Dealing with conflict
    • Gossip / accountability

Ok, folks — there is PREDESTINATION on there! I am so impressed. (Not to mention my other mentee / friend, who just started her own blog with the question “What is sin?” I mean really — how do I get to be friends with all these fantabulous humans???)

The Light shines in the darkness…

Ugh. I feel so gross.

This morning there was yet another school shooting.

At an elementary school.

Mostly in a kindergarten classroom.

Apparently perpetrated by a 24-year old dude who had a thing against his mom, since he shot her and many of her 6-year-old students.

UGH.

This is SICKENING. How could anyone ever ever EVER get to a point where they think it’s a good idea to massacre kindergarteners???

Gross. Gross. Gross.

My soul feels all dirty and I just long so much for heaven, where children will run and never tire, laugh and never cry, and definitely not get shot just for showing up to school on the wrong day.

When tragedies like this happen, I always start to see the world as one big  juxtaposition. And at the time the horrific events occur, it always seems in my mind that the bad outweighs the good, and I say “quickly come, Lord Jesus!” with more longing than usual.

However, having gone through this several times now recently, I know that eventually the emotional overload will pass and this day will become just another horrible part of our nation’s history, and I will remember how people can be good again. And today, I was reminded of the goodness of people in advance.

This morning I met with my group of eight 9th graders. We meet every Friday as a part of their Christian high school’s discipleship program to spend time together, chat, laugh, pray and figure life out together. Today was the last meeting we have before Christmas Break, so some of the girls brought in treats and I had planned for us to have a little “Christmas story time” by watching Charlie Brown Christmas. So we sat down, grabbed some munchies, opened in prayer, and began our usual round-robin of updates.

This week, instead of our usual highs and lows, the girls wanted to share what they were doing for Christmas and in what I’m sure was a moment of Spirit-inspiration I added the question “What’s something that’s been on your heart lately?” I began by sharing my Christmas plans and then explaining how lately my heart has been worrying about future plans — what is my purpose in life? what am I put here to do? — but that God has been helping me learn to have peace even in the not-knowing. The girls nodded, and as we continued around the circle I found that there was quite a lot on our hearts recently. A best friend’s mother with an unknown illness. A grandmother with severe Alzheimer’s. A girl who had made some changes in her life and regained trust with her parents.

As we arrived at the last girl, she began with a deep breath and it became clear that something was weighing on her heavily indeed. “Well… things have been really tight financially in my family this year… my dad lost his job and we’re running out of money and my parents are really worried… they say we might only have one or two presents this year… and it’s hard because I don’t know if I should quit my sport… I just want to help, and I know it costs a lot…”

And then something amazing happened.

As Jessica (not her real name) poured out her worries, the others began to share their stories too. Stories of times when their parents were struggling financially, and when they didn’t know what to do.

Sensing a bit of the overwhelm, I said, “After all that I feel like I want to pray. Anybody else feel like they want to pray?” Silence. “Well let’s pray for a little bit and I’ll just leave some time and then I’ll close when we’re done.” I opened briefly and then just sat and listened.

“Lord, please be with Jessica and her family and help them to find more money so they don’t have to worry as much…”

“God, please help Jessica and her family through this hard time because we know that you don’t do this on purpose to be hard on them, but to teach them…”

“Father, give Jessica strength and comfort that you are there with her, and that you love her and her parents love her and that this isn’t her fault…”

By the end, Jessica was sniffling and my heart was bursting with love and appreciation for these wonderful, caring, supportive, strong, thoughtful humans. We didn’t even get to watch all of Charlie Brown — the bell rang literally 30 seconds before the Christmas story recitation scene (and the whole point of the movie)… but as I listened to Linus proclaim the story from Luke 2, I realized that we had seen the light of the Christ child anyway.

And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.”

Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying,

“Glory to God in the highest heaven,
and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests.”

 

In Which Job Gets a Little Cranky…

Today I read Job 6-9, and I am mainly struck by the stuff Job gets away with saying to/about God! Yesterday (Job 1-5) he cursed the day of his birth, but he stayed pretty respectful to God. Today, however, Job

  • wishes he could take God on in court to argue his own innocence.
  • implies that God torments people for “no reason” (9:17).
  • says that “when a land falls into the hands of the wicked, [God] blindfolds its judges” (9:24).
  • asks God why he won’t leave Job alone “long enough for me to swallow my saliva” (7:19, literally).

Wow! That’s some pretty harsh stuff! If Daniel said anything like that to me in an argument, I would be pissed! Job is cranky, and he offers up some pretty stiff questioning to God — but he never curses God, just complains and wonders about God’s motives. And all this is apparently okay because he’s still righteous in God’s eyes at the end of the story, and he’s described as having great “perseverance” elsewhere in the Bible.

SO the moral of the story for today seems to be that it’s okay to get mad at God, to complain, to question, to speculate about God’s motives… as long as you don’t curse/reject God. And that sounds pretty easy to me right now. I’m like, “Sweet, I can do all those things? And I just have to avoid that one thing? Awesome!” …BUT (a) I’m not really in tough circumstances right now, and I bet it’s a lot harder then, and (b) as evidenced by Genesis 3, we humans don’t really have a great track record of obeying the one thing we’re forbidden.

All the same, I find it comforting to know that we can really let God have it — all our cranky non-understanding — and that’s totally okay.

Why, God? I just don’t get it!

Communion Thoughts for 7/22/12

As I was preparing for these communion thoughts, I couldn’t help but reflect back over the events of this week and wonder how we humans got to be so broken.

First, on Wednesday night we discovered that Pastor’s office had been broken into. Several pieces of computer equipment were taken, but it appears the focus of the thief was on stealing his personal things, including a Christian flag that was handmade by his first wife and lay over her casket at her funeral. This was a personal crime – and I simply don’t understand why anyone would ever do such a thing.

Second, an event that’s been making headlines this week occurred in Aurora, CO after midnight Thursday night. Shortly after the midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises began, a gunman dressed in black announced that he was “the Joker”, threw a canister of teargas into the theater audience, and then opened fire at the crowd, seeming to select his victims at random. 12 were killed and 58 were injured, including several toddlers and children. This horrific, random crime makes no sense. Clearly he was not in his right mind – but I still just don’t understand how anyone could do such a thing.

Of course, these are not the only incomprehensible things going on in the world. Suicide bombers in Syria and Palestine, bomb plots against the Pentagon, school shootings, never-ending wars, and even some places where governments can no longer protect their citizens from the horrors of organized crime. Turn on your TV or read the news – it’s everywhere. But that doesn’t make me understand it any better.

Why do people do these awful things to each other? I just don’t understand!

There are no easy answers. The simple answer to why people do awful things is “sin”, but that only makes my logical brain happy, leaving my heart uneasy. Even the psalmist, even JESUS, asked “why”. WHY, God? Why do people do these things? Why is there such evil in the world?

And that is a question to which we may never know the answer. Certainly we can say “sin”, or “the Devil”… but these answers do not necessarily quench our thirst for understanding, nor do they ease our uneasy hearts. We just want to understand.

In fact, we humans LOVE understanding and “figuring things out” – perhaps explaining the success of mysteries and thrillers – we just LOVE uncovering all the details and the clues that lead to the perpetrator’s arrest and JUSTICE! Open And Shut Case – the bad guy gets what he deserves – end of story.

But real life isn’t like Law & Order. Often times there is no law or order – only chaos and confusion. Real life is messy. Sometimes we are confused, and sometimes we find no answers. We just don’t know.

But God does.

God knows. Our God, who created the heavens and the earth, who knew us before we were born, who’s so big he holds the world in his hand and so small he can live in my heart – my God knows. And we can trust that he’s on our side. The bible tells us, “If God is for us, who can be against us?” (Rom. 8:31) Apparently a lot of people… but the point is that God wins. I still might not understand how – looking at all the mess here on this earth – but it doesn’t matter, because if God indeed has the victory, then there’s no way my finite understanding could ever affect that.

So when something incomprehensible happens, whether it be in your life or in the news, remember that it’s okay to not understand. It’s okay to be confused, because our job is not to have all the answers. That’s God’s job. Our job is to love God and love our neighbor as best we can – even when nothing else makes sense, and even when we don’t understand our world or God’s actions.

As you come to God today, and this week, and always, don’t be afraid – God is here, for you. Ask him your questions. Bring him your confusion and your pain. Struggle. He can take it. And he will always meet you where you are, because he is on your side.